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Introducing Locally Integrated Menus to Unity 7

Hey Ubuntu folks¹!

This is the Unity desktop team and during the last months we focused, as always, in polishing and improving the user experience of our default window manager for the next upcoming LTS!
In fact, while in the last months most of the Canonical commitment to Ubuntu has been directed to the Touch form factors, the “classic” desktop has not been forgotten at all and, we’re still working hard on it, to give our users the best experience and to approach smoothly to the convergence vision that we’ll get with Unity 8.

Part of this work have been the spread improvements, the HighDPI support, the new decorations and tons of various bugs fixed; however with this important milestone coming we also wanted to finally propose a solution to fix the main UX bug we have in Unity since its very first release: the menus being hard to find or too far from their parent window.

In fact, having the applications menus in the top panel really worked very well in small screens but now, especially with HiDPI monitors getting more and more popular, the top panel could be really too far from the actual window location… The solution, that the UX designer JohnLea has defined are the Locally Integrated Menus (LIM).

Ubuntu Unity Integrated Menus

People might recall that also at 12.04 times we implemented a first prototype of LIM, however due to some very-hard-to-fix issues we had with core applications, we decided not to try to propose an half-working solution for an LTS.

So, almost 2 years have passed, but our intent to get this feature done was still strong, although this time we wanted to implement LIMs in the proper way, as Ubuntu quality standards deserve. In addition designers defined a new and improved revision of their work, proposing to show the menus inside the decorations themselves in horizontal mode (until we’ve room for them); so, continuing to save the precious vertical space and keeping the nice look of menu-less windows unchanged.

To be honest, we’d loved to land this way before, but the amount of technical work needed has not to be underestimated.
Being more precise, one of the blockers we had in 12.04 was our dependency on the legacy compiz decor plugin + gtk-window-decorator, that has worked “OK” in the last years but – a part from using deprecated technologies (gtk2 in primis) – it really would have made this concept impossible to realize.

So, the first step has been moving away from the old gtk2-based decorations and writing brand new decorations supporting Gtk3 CSS theming² inside Unity itself; this has been an huge work (including writing a brand-new widget system for handling compiz textures in a more natural way), but it gave us great benefits in the end such as much faster windows resizing , improved look, support for dynamic scaling (for both HighDPI and accessibility reasons).

Once we had this new layout where to place any widget quite easily, all took shape in few lines, we only had to handle the fact that now menus opens on mouse button release and only if the user doesn’t keep it pressed for too long³, while a slightly trickier part was to handle the case where we had a too small window to show menus in horizontal mode, and where we had to fallback to a dropdown menu.

LIM’s dropdown, shown if we have not enough space

As this is an LTS release, before setting this menu mode as the default we wanted to have some community feedback. For now, you have to enable it using the Unity Control Center Appearance panel, and let us know what you think!

Unity Control Center with Application Menu settings

Tweakers might be happy to know that there are also other settings you can use to adjust your LIM experience under the com.canonical.Unity.IntegratedMenus gsettings schema, that allows to define the pressure and movements thresholds, and to also enable double-click over the menus (to maximize the window, if you’re fast enough); However, while you can adjust the settings for now, we encourage to use the defaults as they are based on wide user testing and are coherent with our design guidelines.

After some words, I guess it’s time to see them in action, and upgrade your Ubuntu Trusty machine to enjoy them!


Youtube Video

[1] Hello Planet, I should also probably say! ;)
[2] We really encourage and support anyone who wants to update its theme to support Unity
[3] Maximum press time is configurable, but default values are based on design user testing

170 commenti

  1. This is awesome, but is not useful on gnome app menus like nautilus that’s a single menu.

    Comment by Rafael Santos — 20 febbraio 2014 @ 23:24

  2. Well, if there’s one menu we show just one… The thing is moving them back to the window.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 20 febbraio 2014 @ 23:47

  3. […] Sources: omgubuntu, bregmatter, Treviño […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04 brings back menus in application windows - Muktware — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:13

  4. Very nice work Marco. However, please consider this:

    When a window is active, it’s title is less useful than when it’s inactive. We see all its content and most of the time that’s information enough. The menu should be fixed in such case, being the window title the part that vanishes. Otherwise, when the window is inactive, the menu makes no sense, so we should see just the title.

    If the menu is permanently visible, the user might be given the option to see the title by hovering over the window buttons or the empty space to the right of the menu (if there’s any).

    A checkbox saying: “Make the menu permanently visible on active window”, right below the “In window title bars” ratio button would easily accomplish this. I would go as far as to suggest this should be the default behavior for that option.

    Comment by Sicofante — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:22

  5. The menu should be fixed (permanently visible) in such case, being the
    window title the part that vanishes.

    Well, I don’t think this is true in all the cases… Think to a browser or a document editor, you want to be sure where you in a clear way… An “hidden” option might be provided but imho is not that useful.

    Otherwise, when the window is
    inactive, the menu makes no sense, so we should see just the title.

    That’s already the case ;)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:30

  6. I actually prefer the top panel menu, even on my large work monitors. I understand if you want to switch the default, but is the option of switching back staying?

    Comment by Tinche — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:31

  7. Sure, the Unity Control Center option will stay forever…

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:35

  8. […] Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | Kronosim — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:36

  9. […] The Collective February 20, 2014 Ars Technica Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows » Borg Prime — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:38

  10. […] Posted on February 20, 2014 by admin • Leave a comment Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | Son Dakika İnternet — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:40

  11. Good news, thanks. Looking forward to 14.04.

    Comment by Tinche — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:47

  12. That’s nice, but is there any chance that we also get a gsettings option for the original idea, i.e. a LIM button? That doesn’t seem difficult to implement now, since that’s basically what happens in smaller windows. The original idea was great, and I’m sure lots of people find it more consistent, especially with the popularity of third-party applications that use a menu button (like Chromium).

    Comment by John Smith — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:53

  13. That’s doable, yes… But well there’s not much time for that and now I’d prefer to focus on improving things, but patches welcome :)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:55

  14. From the discussion on OMGUbuntu:

    I personally feel like it would have been much better to put a Menu
    button next to the window controls, that then opens into a menu that
    requires no extra clicking to open the categories, just mouse-over like in the
    right-click menu or how the old gnome2 application menu worked. Not only would this conserve just as much space, and
    keep the window title much cleaner, but it also retains the full simplicity of dragging windows around that we currently enjoy, with no risk of confusing people or causing annoying mis-clicks when trying to simply drag a window.
    I’m not an expert, but I definitely feel like that would be a more polished approach that’s less likely to confuse new users. And I’d personally rather just have a menu button, even if it’s optional.

    Comment by Uber Dudditz — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:56

  15. This is exactly the core issue preventing Canonical from implementing a Gnome-like system. Most applications have more than one menu. I think that the Ubuntu solution is better for what is out there at the moment. However, I prefer Gnome’s “One Button Approach” better for applications that have been designed to have fewer menus to begin with (like Gnome’s core apps which are still in development). A full change to one-button menus requires a paradigm-shift…

    Comment by Syzygy — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 00:56

  16. […] This new type of menu was first announced at the beginning of 2012 and was supposed to be added to Ubuntu 12.04 but it was subsequently delayed until now, when this feature finally landed in Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr. LIM is of course not used by default, but it can easily be enabled from the settings. Currently, you must use Dconf Editor to enable it, but soon you’ll be able to enable locally integrated menus from System Settings > Appearance, on the Behavior tab, as Marco Trevisan explains on his blog: […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04 Gets Locally Integrated Menus (LIM) | Misiongeek — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:02

  17. Allright, thanks for the answer. Keep on the great work!

    Comment by John Smith — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:18

  18. Well, that was the initial design, but dropdown menus aren’t that handy especially if you look for something (yeah, better to use Hud, but still…).
    Also let me know when you try, but I think that the usability is really good also if the menus work as both clickable and draggable area.

    That’s not hard to implement what you suggest though, but I don’t think that we’ve time (or design approval) :/

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:33

  19. […] Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | Tech Tips — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:33

  20. […] February 20, 2014 11:20 pm | admin Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | Binary Reveux — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:36

  21. […] The intent of moving application-specific menus into the global menu bar was to leave more room for content in applications. But even for people who liked the design, it has grown more problematic over time with the proliferation of bigger monitors, according to Canonical employee Marco Trevisan. The Ubuntu desktop team is bringing the application windows back into the application windows themselves for the 14.04 release in April this year, Trevisan wrote today. […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows - Vietnhi Tìm kiếm — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:38

  22. I agree with @Sicofante:disqus: Could you provide an option to make the menu permanently visible when a window is active? (Maybe also via Dconf-editor)

    Comment by ubuntu_fan — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:51

  23. Well, I don’t think this is true in all the cases… Think to a browser
    or a document editor, you want to be sure where you in a clear way… An
    “hidden” option might be provided but imho is not that useful.

    It’s true for MOST of the cases, which should be enough, I believe. Even when browsing or document editing, how many times do you need to check the window title to know where you are? I’d be very careful choosing defaults here and not based on mere opinion. Have you considered making a proper usability test to find out?

    Consider yet another issue: Fitts’ Law. Yes, I know it’s been abused by many, but bear with me. :-)

    If the global menu vanishes, it’s bad because you can’t aim your target (because it’s invisible) and so you can’t get to your target in one trip. You go up there then the menu shows up, then -on a second trip- you aim and hit your target. As I said, that’s bad enough but at least the second trip has one dimension blocked: no vertical movement is produced while you’re hitting the top of the screen and aiming for your target (now visible).

    Now what happens with a vanishing menu on a window title/menu bar? You can’t aim your target (because it’s invisible) so you get to the title bar in your first trip, then you must move horizontally but this time you don’t have the vertical axis blocked by any limits. Painful.

    Again, I suggest you do a proper usability test before release. Actually two. The first should respond to the question: “How many times do we check the title of our active window?” The second one should be “How hard is to hit a menu item on a vanishing menu versus an always visible menu?”

    The mix of the results of these two tests would provide the best background to make a proper decision. A serious decision like this shouldn’t be taken by mere opinion, I hope you agree.

    PS: Personal trivia: Does your family come from Galicia, Spain? Treviño is a very common family name around here.

    Comment by Sicofante — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:52

  24. Well, many menus have multiple levels, which means we will have to use dropdown menus regardless of whether or not the LIM starts out that way.
    And maybe it’s possible to have the menu open up horizontally rather than vertically, if that may help with readability… But regardless, I’m glad something is being done in regards to the LIM. Maybe later on the menu button option will be available and people like me will be happy enough to do a jig. It’s too bad Gnome-shell doesn’t have their menu buttons beside the window controls.

    Comment by Uber Dudditz — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 01:59

  25. Gnome is going their own particular route which may be fine for gnome-only apps, but is devastating for cross-platform development. I applaud Ubuntu’s decision to stay with traditional menus (even if vanishing ;-) since that’s how ALL platforms -but Gnome and Elementary- work, including Windows and Mac OS.

    Comment by Sicofante — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 02:01

  26. My only concern is moving the window with mouse. In the video it looks good, but will it confuse new users? Is there time limit before one can drag or click the menu item ? Anyway it looks very good.

    Comment by xpress razor — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 03:16

  27. Great, I am too tired off with eclipse :))

    Comment by Anh Ngọc — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 03:34

  28. […] By Jon Brodkin Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by The Blow Magazine | Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 03:39

  29. I would like to see this option be introduced.

    Comment by Vadim Peretokin — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 05:09

  30. […] The intent of moving application-specific menus into the global menu bar was to leave more room for content in applications. But even for people who liked the design, it has grown more problematic over time with the proliferation of bigger monitors, according to Canonical employee Marco Trevisan. The Ubuntu desktop team is bringing the application windows back into the application windows themselves for the 14.04 release in April this year, Trevisan wrote today. […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | Matias Vangsnes — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 06:30

  31. Great news!

    PS: there is a problem with the link pointing to “main UX bug” the correct link is https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/682788

    Comment by Pablo SEMINARIO — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 07:24

  32. Looks great! Thank you for all the hard work.

    Comment by radiostorm — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 07:33

  33. […] Menus integrated within applications are coming to Unity in Ubuntu 14.04. Marco Trevisan […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu desktop moving application menus back into application windows | — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:27

  34. I like the new GNOME3 way better: have a global menu for the application, and window menus hidden inside “wheel” icons inside the window title bar (which is merged with the toolbar). I definitely think it’s the way to go, not only for the sake of unification but because it is logical, it saves space, it doesn’t hide any element (very important), and it looks very nice.

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:41

  35. […] некоторых пользователей работой глобального меню и заявили о возвращении в Unity поддержки меню, размещаемого не в […]

    Pingback by В Ubuntu 14.04 будет возвращена поддержка отображения меню в окнах приложений | AllUNIX.ru — Всероссийский портал о UNIX-системах — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:41

  36. I agree that the menu should never be hidden. At least, there should be a “menu” button permanently on the title bar. As an application developer, I have a hard time guiding my users around when they can’t even find the menu I created…

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:44

  37. >> that’s how ALL platforms -but Gnome and Elementary- work

    Well, so, in the free desktop world, that’s really 50/50 (GNOME + Elementary VS KDE + Unity). And, in the “cross-platform” world, Both Chrome and Firefox do follow GNOME’s UI philosophy (or is it the other way around), and those two web browsers are about the only applications used by most Mac and Window users nowadays… And I’m not even talking about mobile operating systems here… So I’d say that the “wheel-menu in toolbar way” is now the new dominating UI paradigm for menus, and others are just resisting…

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:51

  38. Well, Firefox handles it with one “Firefox” menu, and several sub-menus arranged smartly. And that works very well, doesn’t it?

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:53

  39. I think the “menu button” idea would involve having a top-level menu with 2 or 3 columns, like Firefox does it. This way, it takes less vertical space and makes it easier to find what you want.

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:55

  40. I fully agree: having a menu button has 3 advantages:
    – it looks similar to the GNOME3 way, and so helps integration.
    – it lets a lot of space on the title bar for the window title and to make it easier for users to drag the window around.
    – it looks nicer with less useless text on the screen when you don’t need it (because having the menu just disappear – as it is done now – is an absolute no-go, of course).

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 09:59

  41. What exactly prevents having the menus in both the top bar and the application window? That would suit everyone without needing to set an option.

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 10:00

  42. […] Fuente | Treviño’s Blog […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04 sustituirá el menú global por otro propio para cada app — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 10:15

  43. This is great. Especially that it’s configurable. On my laptop I’d continue using the top menu but on my desktop I’d really love locally integrated menus.

    One of the biggest user that I support have is that they can’t find the menu. So if you insist on autohiding the menu of the active window, could you at least make that configurable (gsettings is okay)? This is really the number one question I get: I can’t find the menu.

    Comment by dakira — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 11:59

  44. […] Fuente | Treviño’s Blog […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04 sustituirá el menú global por otro propio para cada app | Grupo Libre — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 12:31

  45. […] I think Marco is better at describing the history and technical issues behind this effort. I recommend you read his post. […]

    Pingback by Stephen M. Webb: Locally Integrated Menus for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS | Hi-tech news — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 13:36

  46. […] Go to Source […]

    Pingback by Marco Trevisan (Treviño): Introducing Locally Integrated Menus to Unity 7 | Hi-tech news — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 13:36

  47. […] via http://blog.3v1n0.net […]

    Pingback by memo-linux.com » Ubuntu 14.04 LTS: comment activer l’affichage des menus des applications dans Unity — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 14:42

  48. Sadly the most important feature is still missing: A simple checkbox that disables the auto-hide behavior.

    Comment by the_noname — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 15:36

  49. Great proposal, thank you for acknowledging that sometimes it is actually better to give the user some configuration choice.

    I wish you folks had shown the same attitude when throwing out the systray support. It so much sucks that I have to rely on external PPAs that provide a patched version of unity to re-enable the systray.

    Comment by DumboTheFlyingOliphant — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 15:37

  50. That not happens in Ubuntu, and personally I don’t like dropdown that much. They can be a solution for some cases, but having the menus in horizontal mode makes things easier to access.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 15:54

  51. Again, I suggest you [or someone in the design team] do a proper usability test before release. Actually two. The first should respond to the question: “How many times do we check the title of our active window?” The second one should be “How much harder/slower is it to hit a menu item on a vanishing menu versus an always visible menu?”

    Well we did many of them… And it’s thanks to these usability tests that we come to this solution. Having a dropdown-menu (à la firefox-in-windows) wouldn’t help much here either, so… I see if design allows to add an option to show menus everytime, but I’m not sure about the result.
    As for now, just keep Alt pressed if you need to see the menus without using the mouse :P

    PS: Personal trivia: Does your family come from Galicia, Spain? Treviño is a very common family name around here.

    No, Treviño is just a “nickname” based on my actual surname… I’m Italian. Btw Galicia is beautiful :)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:00

  52. Yeah, probably a better solution, but we’d need too much tweaking with custom gtk menus to get that for having this in 14.04 timeframe (and thus… for unity7 scope probably).

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:03

  53. Well, nothing prevents the menu from being displayed horizontally after pressing the dropdown menu. That’s (partly) what Firefox does.

    Comment by julien — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:04

  54. Yeah, there are some configurable options which allows to define the thresholds when an action starts. BTW dragging will be easy as it used to be…

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:04

  55. It’s already in Ubuntu, just not the default (yet?)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:04

  56. Yes, my point is that an app has to be designed for one button (which works better IMHO).

    Comment by Syzygy — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:08

  57. Yes, but I think application menus shouldn’t exist. They’re bad UI…

    Comment by Syzygy — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:09

  58. Yeah I know… And I tried to fix it, but for some reasons WordPress continues to add some garbage at the end… While the HTML seems correct, but there’s something on JS that breaks it :o.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:11

  59. Well would it be possible to create an option to get the menu shown in the window And in the top bar?

    Comment by Steffen Coenen — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:28

  60. Not that easy… You can see them “under the decoration” everywhere, using some tweaks.

    Comment by Treviño — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:42

  61. Not easy, but you can use the UBUNTU_MENUPROXY=0 tweak to always see them.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 16:43

  62. First, in the mugshot/screenshot of Unity control center, should it not be “In the top bar”: the top bar is singular and countable ,so it needs a determinant – there is only one top bar, so a definite article.

    Also, would it be now possible to tackle this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/unity/+bug/762277 It is about difficulty of closing maximized windows when they are not focused. A solution would be to always show close/minimize/unmaximize buttons on global menu of fullscreened apps or at least an option to provide them.

    Comment by sup — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 17:01

  63. No, i don’t want to to get it back into the old (pre-unity) place. I just thought about having the menu both in the window decoration and the global menu.

    Comment by Steffen Coenen — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 17:23

  64. That’s what we do now, but for maximized windows… You would like to get them visible in two places? Mh, that wouldn’t be ever allowed by designers (nor, in personal opinion by me) :)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:18

  65. First, in the mugshot/screenshot of Unity control center, should it not
    be “In the top bar”: the top bar is singular and countable ,so it needs a
    determinant – there is only one top bar, so a definite article.

    Well, feel free to propose a bug for that…. We can fix it until string freeze.

    Also, would it be now possible to tackle this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubu… It is about difficulty of closing maximized windows when they are not focused.

    This is fixed in LIM mode then :)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:21

  66. Bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity-control-center/+bug/1283150

    Oh yeah, i can see that it is fixed in the first screenshot. Great!

    Comment by sup — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:26

  67. […] So to solve the problem, Ubuntu will return to locally integrated menus (LIM), Canonical software engineer Marco Trevisan explained in a post on his personal blog. […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu’s ditching Unity’s global menu, returning to in-app menus | Matias Vangsnes — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:30

  68. Just started using this. Looks good. I had got used to, and like a lot, the global menu, so this takes some getting used to having things local again. Whatever the default adopted, having the choice would be great.

    Just one comment to consider … the notification bar now looks like it’s occupying too much space without any use. It might, therefore, be time to consider a Wingpanel Slim approach (see http://www.elementaryupdate.com/2013/06/safely-use-wingpanel-slim.html), or else find some new used for the notification bar. One solution to the suggestion of Sicofante (below) is to have the active window’s name in the top bar and the menu always visible in that window’s title bar, then hide the menu and move the window name back to the title bar when the window is inactive.

    Keep up the good work!

    Comment by Alwyn — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:31

  69. I like it, been testing, and once the testing is done I will go back to global as I am used to that. That being said, I would like to see the current active application icon/application name on the top Unity bar when I have this set. Right now it is just blank, and just looks odd as I am used seeing something there. I have attached an image, so in my case it would be nice to see Nightly or Nightly’s icon.

    Comment by Mohan — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 18:38

  70. The principal reason I use Ubuntu, despite the hassle of removing the keylogging action and all that, is the launcher on the left and menus in the panel that give me space on my laptop display, which is the 15-something inch monitor and the horrible 1366×768 resolution, both of which are fairly ubiquitous.
    I see that keeping the menu where it is now in Unity is an option at this point. I hope it remains that way because I’m lazy and would like to just continue using Ubuntu.

    Comment by 2eurocents — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 19:06

  71. YES! I was a participant advocating exactly this in the mailing lists back when we were talking about moving menu bar. But who would listen to the non-devs who can’t submit patches to prove their thing? :/

    Whatever the screen size and resolution, having the menubar in the window is the only thing that makes sense. Even in the netbooks, the for factor that was popular around the time the idea was conceived, the only viable input method was the touchpad. It is a pain to move the cursor from a window to the menubar with those tiny touchpads.

    Comment by the 1 — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 19:36

  72. And speaking of mailing lists, there was also a mock up of title bars with titles to the left backgrounded by a giant version of the application’s icon. For example a Firefox window has a part of a large Firefox icon shown on the left side of the window with Firefox written above it.

    I liked this mock up because it makes the window more identifiable whether the title is visible or now. The menu on the title-bar can be always half-faded and fade-out completely to the left where the title begins. When the cursor moves to the menu, the title can then fade out and the title will appear normally as it does now. I think this would look more beutiful, informative and address the invisible menu being difficult to find.

    Comment by Oxwivi — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 19:47

  73. […] So to solve the problem, Ubuntu will return to locally integrated menus (LIM), Canonical software engineer Marco Trevisan explained in a post on his personal blog. […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu’s ditching Unity’s global menu, returning to in-app menus | UshaGeek — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 20:04

  74. Well we did many of them… And it’s thanks to these usability tests that we come to this solution.

    Can we see those usability tests? Have they actually tested how terribly difficult it is to aim an invisible target in the middle of the screen? I still don’t have 14.04 installed (I’ll install it ASAP after this new development) but a close friend (a non technical guy) has been testing it this afternoon and agrees: aiming at menus on the titlebar of a non-maximized window is very hard.

    Ubuntu doesn’t even provide a[n easy] means to control pointer acceleration, which is vital when in implementing a global menu on hardware you don’t make yourself (unlike Apple) and is absolutely indispensable when you have menus in the middle of the screen, especially the vanishing type Ubuntu designers are so proud of…

    Please check the bug this development is helping to fix. The conclusions read as follows:

    The following options will be added to ‘System Settings/Appearance':
    ——-
    Menus
    Location: Global/Local
    Visibility: Hidden/Always displayed
    ——-

    The second part is missing.

    PD: Funny that Italians make nicknames using Spanish terminations. We do just the same with Italian terminations: it’s very common to add “-ini” to a name so it sounds Italian and bingo! new nickname! ;-) Pablo->Pablini, Manolo->Manolini, etc. ;-) Mediterranean brothers I guess. :-)

    Comment by Sicofante — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 21:05

  75. Have you considered an option (or default) design to always show the menu pro unmaximized windows (since the title of the active window could go to to top bar that is otherwise empty)? I think I would personally use it (but would have to try it first:-)).

    Comment by sup — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 21:31

  76. […] Treviño’s Blog Jetzt hat sich das Unity Desktop Team des Problems angenommen und eine Alternative entwickelt, die […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04 kickt das globale Menü | HZM Webhosting & EDV - Service — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 21:41

  77. Unity does not have a main UX bug, it is a UX bug. I am using Unity now since Ubuntu 12.04 is available. For me, it is ok, since I work most of the time from the console window and that was, why I gave it a try.

    I do not think, that Unity is a good desktop at all. Unitiy does not bring improvements to UX over other and older desktop software. Instead it mainly replaces core functionality by basically nothing. Unity confuses emptiness with well organized simpleness or purity.

    One eg. is the dash, which replaces, what we call the start menu on windows computers. Providing a simple search solution to search the computer is a really good idea, but it is not a replacement for a menu. A search is only useful, when I can verbalize, what I want, which is not always possible. A menu provides the possibility, to browse all available options, which is a more intuitive approach. A couple of days ago, I installed an application, where I did not know the name in my language but only in English and where the name of the installed application even was different due to a name change. It was impossible to start it through the dash since I did not know, what to search for. In a start menu I would have found it easily, since I could imagine to what category it belongs and then I had to browse only a couple of names and select the one, which matches best or try some of the applications. This was impossible with the dash. I then googled and started the application via the console window. The dash therefore is not intuitive, because it makes me think.

    Same is with the application menu issue. There is nothing wrong with having the menu on the top of the screen instead of in the window. Mac users have no problems with it. But it shows a complete lack of an understanding of UX, when you change your design from in-window menus to top screen menus. You should not design against the expectations of your users, and people who are using Linux computers obviously expect something completely different. And even your newest approach shows, that you would prever to get rid of the menu at all, if possible, but at least, you want to hide it. This shows, what is wrong in the Unity UX: design kills functionality. It looks good, but it does not work good and esp. not better than older solutions for the same problem. Every 30 year old Mac beats Unity easily though its design looks very poor today.

    And it makes me think: I know have to find out, if an application provides a menu or not by hovering over the window title bars, while before I could see it instantly and what options are available. It is as brain dead as styling links in HTML with CSS and then adding an icon to them, after you found out, that the number of clicks decreased, to indicate, that the styled text are links, which was obvious without the styling.

    And it is hard to understand, what problem you are trying to solve? You tell us, the new design gives us more space for content. What the heck are you thinking, what type of computers we are using in 2014? Many computers have FullHD displays, on the desk with 20 inch or more. There displays are bigger and have a higher resolution than ever. Even my 15″ has 1920×1200 pixels. Future computers will even have higher resolitions thanks to Retina displays. There is no need to trade functionality for space.

    On the other hand we have mobile devices like smartphones and tablets. But nobody wants to use applications on these devices with user interfaces, which were designed for desktop computers and vice versa. To provide a good UX you have to design for each device separately since they are used completely different. That is why we use mainly Windows on the Desktop but IOS and Android on mobile devices and why people hate Windows 8.

    The Windows 8 and Unity approach make people think and bring us back into the pre-GUI-era. Again we have to learn key-stroke-sequences, gestures and where things are hidden, and if we do not know them, we miss functionality, which is availabe and cannot intuitivly find it any more. In that sense Unity is more a graphical console window than a graphical user interface (GUI).

    While my girlfriend still uses Ubuntu 10,04, since I do not want to upgrade her desktop because I fear the support, that I then will have to give her. I will give 14.04 and Unity a try, promised!

    But please, as Steve Krug put it: “Don’t make me think!”

    Comment by Thoma — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 22:19

  78. Aah. I’m not sure about setting it default – I like the current way, even though I do work on 1080p monitors. My only beef with appmenu is in 13.04+ it does a bad job of showing up or shows the wrong things. I quite like the idea behind the design otherwise.

    Comment by Vadim Peretokin — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 22:30

  79. […] que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Páginas Mendocinas — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 22:30

  80. There is this (mis)feature, that an application run by root, does not integrate with the global menu. How does this property play with the new concepts ?

    Comment by angel — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 23:07

  81. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Grupo Libre — 21 febbraio 2014 @ 23:30

  82. I think this is a good idea.

    Comment by z Simmons — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 00:18

  83. Agreed Vanishing menus need to die in a fire Also consider adding a switch to the Disable Global menu’s auto behavior both are just terrible from a useability perspective.

    Please consider some people are willing to sacrifice “lack of clutter” for useability

    Comment by Chad Germann — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 00:26

  84. As for now, just keep Alt pressed if you need to see the menus without using the mouse

    this is cruft design the ability is there in the menu auto discover option just let us increase the timing of that to along the lines of four hours

    Comment by Chad Germann — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 00:29

  85. […] Źródło: http://blog.3v1n0.net/informatica/linux/ubuntu-introducing-locally-integrated-menus-to-unity-7/ […]

    Pingback by Unity (ubuntu 14.04) – menu na belce… | mySwiat — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 00:30

  86. Well… I just can’t imagine Krita, the Gimp, OpenShotVideoEditor or KdenLive, to name a few, being usable only with that wheel-thing…

    Comment by Gérald Maruccia — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 01:07

  87. Usability tests have two parts: the test itself and the conclusions you draw from it. The second part goes beyond the test itself and enters the area of logic and interpretation. In the case of the dodge, the logic was flawed: if the dodge is confusing the logical conclusion is “disable it by default”. The conclusion “remove it” doesn’t respond to logic. As simple as that.

    Usability tests must be made by independent teams. If they’re done by the design team itself, there will be an obvious bias over the design team prejudices (and these are always strong).

    When I refer to usability tests I’m obviously asking for independent ones made with a bit of logic. In other words, the contrary of what ended in the infamous dodge fiasco.

    Comment by Sicofante — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 01:22

  88. The windows title is always useful for anyone dealing with many documents and many softwares at the same time, moreover if you do that on many virtual desktops… Which is probably the case for people in “production” situation – when you have to edit spreadsheets, scribus documents, images with the gimp, updating blogs and websites through firefox, editing professionnal conversations with audacity while encoding DCP for broadcasting in digital cinema…

    Definetly windows titles are helpful at least to know on which documents you are copying and pasting, for example.

    That being said, LIM is a great idea for “normal” desktop screens, I mean screens bigger than 19″

    Comment by Gérald Maruccia — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 01:22

  89. You are aware that nobody is asking to remove window titles, right? It’s a question of preference FOR THE ACTIVE WINDOW ONLY. The rest of the windows will always show the title (there’s no use for a menu on a non-active window, this should be obvious by now).

    The top bar will always contain the menu AND the title. Only one of them is shown at a time for the active window. This happens both with LIM and GM. Currently Unity gives preference to the title on the active window. Some of us are advocating for the menu to take preference AS AN OPTION. You could always see the title of the active window by hovering over certain areas (window buttons and empty areas in the top bar are proposed) or pressing the Alt key. Just the reverse of how it works now.

    Let me insist: we’re asking it AS AN OPTION. Unity designers are free to keep the default as is, but I believe we’ve made a rational case for the behavior we’re proposing.

    Comment by Sicofante — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 01:33

  90. How conveniently you forget XFCE, LMDE, Enlightenment, etc., etc., etc. Also conveniently ignoring the fact that Unity and KDE have probably ten times more users than the rest together, let alone Windows and OS X.

    And regarding applications, it’s ONLY Chrome and Firefox who do that. You may disregard the rest of the millions of desktop apps out there, but that won’t change the fact that traditional menus are all over the place while the cog menu is very rarely seen anywhere.

    Finally, you can’t mix and match phone/tablet and desktop apps layouts at will. Despite the fact that most mobile apps I’m using right now have nothing compared to the cog.

    Nice try.

    Comment by Sicofante — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 02:06

  91. Why not have the option to allow the title and the menus visible at the same time? http://www.webupd8.org/2011/02/unity-mockup-menu-integrated-in-window.html

    Comment by Gavin Engel — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 02:56

  92. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones - Tech-News — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 03:47

  93. All menus should be always visible. They should not require a mouse-hover to display. Keep it simple. Having the menus always visible makes them work nicely on touch displays as well as with a mouse or touchpad. Don’t hid user interface elements (this has been a HUGE problem for Windows 8).

    Comment by EdH — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 04:21

  94. I also believe that Global Menu (or top bar) should **always** display its menus, not only on mouse over.
    This is the right time to add that long missing option, you’ll make Unity an amazing tool if you add the option, which, IMHO, should be the default setting.

    Comment by hictio — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 05:30

  95. […] некоторых пользователей работой глобального меню и заявили о возвращении в Unity поддержки меню, размещаемого не в […]

    Pingback by В Ubuntu 14.04 будет возвращена поддержка отображения меню в окнах приложений | Просто блог — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 06:33

  96. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Blogdesktop — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 07:24

  97. That might work for some people, but then we’ve other issues in case we have a maximized window: we don’t show the name of it if unfocused, and if focused we can’t show the title.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 08:10

  98. This is something I also proposed to designers as soon as I made this implementation, since I got the same same feeling, but showing the active application name might be confusing (as it will shown only if we have no maximized window).
    Showing an “Ubuntu desktop” string could be a solution, but I also think that this is mostly a matter of habit, I’m now using it for some weeks and I don’t miss the title anymore ;-)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 08:14

  99. It’s not an option, it’s the default. However you won’t lose any space with LIM. You’d save mouse movements instead.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 08:16

  100. […] I think Marco is better at describing the history and technical issues behind this effort. I recommend you read his post. […]

    Pingback by Stephen M. Webb: Locally Integrated Menus for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS | itux.info — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 08:20

  101. Unfortunately we can’t access to the menus of a root application… I it’s just a simple matter of permissions…

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 08:25

  102. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Misiongeek — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 10:01

  103. […] menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de principio”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | TECNOLOGÍA — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 10:05

  104. You’re absolutely right, and that’s exactly why each application has to make its own UI choices. And that’s also why it is very important for distributors to trust the developers and respect their choices. And Canonical is doing exactly the opposite of this. I just hope they learn from their mistakes…

    Comment by julien — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 12:57

  105. Well thanks for making it clear-er :-) Yes an option has to be proposed or an easy way to quickly switch between those menus and titles.

    Anyway I’m very impatient to use those new features as I immediatly can see the comfort they will bring to me day to day !

    Comment by Gérald Maruccia — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 13:09

  106. Mmmm… I really think the LIM thing is a good idea, very consistent with the global feel and look of Unity and it leaves enough room for mixes : title windows + horizontal menu + one-global-button-or-array and any other things future can bring.

    I’m not used to gnome3 so I won’t criticise it, I still can’t imagine how just one button could sum-up all the menus of an app – except if this app’ has been designed specifically within this aim.

    And I’m not that sure app’ developpers are aware of how people really use their softwares, regarding of usability and ergonomy :-D it’s not at all Canonical specific and that’s why each DE or distribution tries to answer in its own way.

    Comment by Gérald Maruccia — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 13:34

  107. Hi Marco! Thank you very much for your work in Ubuntu! Have you considered this:

    – When a window is maximized, do we really need the title? Is the title or the menus (fixed menu) more useful?

    – When a window isn’t maximized why not show the tile in the top unity bar for the active window and the menus (fixed) in the window top bar?

    – Unmaximized, inactive windows could perhaps have window title in the window top bar?

    I really like Ubuntu and this new option is awesome. Thanks.

    Comment by jmsm — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 17:55

  108. Brilliant move. Thanks for listening & respecting your users by offering them choice.

    Feedback: “the menus being hard to find or too far from their parent window” Thanks for this feature because we feel this is optimum use of space both pixels & mind-space. Also, so happy to hear: the “classic” desktop has not been forgotten at all and, we’re still working hard on it

    May I suggest other great features that will increase Ubuntu’s popularity:

    An option for the ‘Classic User Interface': The task bar (bottom panel) with a ‘Menu’ button (like
    Linux Mint or the ‘Start button’ of Windows). This will bring back & encourage a lot of people to use Ubuntu who find this a ‘familiar’ & comfortable UX. Once they like the OS they will find the Unity UX better & will be more conditioned to accept & like its features.
    Because there is no “Classic” UI, I am forced to install Kubuntu instead, for some people.

    In addition, an option not to club similar windows & stack it together. For example, if there
    are 2 Writer file documents, their names should be next to each other in the task bar / bottom panel. In other words, one file should not hide another file of the same App/ program.

    Comment by Indian_Art — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 18:40

  109. @hittio Now Global Menu shares screen space / real estate with the Title & when the Menus are not needed only the Title shows. This I feel is ideal as because it is optimal use of space & house keeping by tucking away the clutter. I hope the present system continues.

    Comment by Indian_Art — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 18:46

  110. Very cool and thank you! If you don’t mind I have some thoughts.

    People are all working on “convergence” (especially windows). But with such different mediums (desktop / tablet , keyboard mouse/ touch) and screen sizes and multi screen, I think another approach that you are starting to show the way with right here is the approach:

    A toolkit that seamlessly provides different “interface display profiles” on different mediums that can be easily switched between, and the underlying code is the same.

    On the desktop and on multiscreen setups for a long time I have liked focus-follow-mouse and in-app-menus (glabal menu + focus-follow-mouse is totally a no go :P) so on all my desktops the first thing I do is strip out the global menu :/. However, I have found in the last couple years that on my 10″ netbook, I usually alt-tab between full screen apps, and I do like the global menu there. :)

    So canonical/ubuntu/unity, providing a GUI that can switch between different modes, provides the best single point of flexibility. Meanwhile, Microsoft’s approach of having a completely separate “classic desktop mode” and “metro mode” seems likes a total fail as we have seen.

    So please keep up the good work on providing a toolkit/interface that can work differently and well on many different displays and platforms!

    Comment by Dan Ballard — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 19:53

  111. Why doesn’t the local menu activate when you mouse over the title bar of a non-active window?

    Comment by Josh — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 19:56

  112. I’d like the local menu to appear on non-active windows as well. Sometimes, I just want to access the menu of a non-active window with a single click. The video shows that it requires 2 clicks. One to make the window active and another to actually click on a menu item.

    Comment by ocra — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 20:10

  113. […] Las palabras de Marco Trevisan (desarrollador) fueron: […]

    Pingback by Muere el Global Menu de Ubuntu, vuelven el menú a las ventanas en el próximo Ubuntu como de toda una vida — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 20:28

  114. I understand the limitation why root application’s menu cannot be integrated with the global menu. Will the local menu (the Unity version) work with root applications ? If no, then I don’t understand the difference between displaying the local menu in two lines (as is done today), and the single line ‘Unity’ local menu.

    Comment by angel — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 21:56

  115. When a window isn’t maximized why not show the tile in the top unity bar for the active window and the menus (fixed) in the window top bar?

    I think this is a great idea. We wouldn’t have to choose between menu and title and would be using a wasted space (the top bar, which will be empty when using local menus).

    At the same time, this should be very easy to implement, right Marco? Please ask “permission” to the designers to implement this!!!

    Comment by Sicofante — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 22:19

  116. A few questions to ponder. Why does the Top bar need to display the application name at all? It is after all already displayed in the windows title bar and that is only not displayed when it is full screen an than it is simply extraneous information.

    Why should the application name (Worthless information) given display priority over the location of Application controls (Useful information)?

    Comment by Chad Germann — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 22:22

  117. this is exactly my issue these “Useability tests” have never been fully published nor has the method or the testing agency.

    As i understand it Usability testing is cone using a Sampling of persons that ideally represents a cross section of a population (Representative Sample) . Test such as these are easly skewed nt just by interpretation of the data but poor Sampling for example was the sample pulled at a shopping mall or, was it was it pulled at the UDS?

    Comment by Chad Germann — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 22:37

  118. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Compartiendo — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 22:44

  119. […] los menús que son difíciles de encontrar o que están muy lejos de su ventana de origen”, escribió el desarrollador Marco Trevisan. “Tener los menús de aplicaciones en el panel superior […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu traerá de vuelta los menús a las ventanas de aplicaciones | Sistema Geek — 22 febbraio 2014 @ 22:56

  120. Oh wow. That’s very bad news for me. I’ll just use 13.10 until I figure something else out. I wonder what you’ll put in the panel? It will just be empty now, the whole left side and center of it? Seems pretty odd.

    Comment by 2eurocents — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 00:16

  121. http://tiamat.tsotech.com/displays-are-the-key

    this also raises some more points. for some bizarre reason monitors and desktops have been stuck in a no growth weird zone for like a decade. compared to all other computing parts advancing like moore’s laws it’s really strange. but its partly because we don’t know what we’d do with bigger desktops. but ideally some people would like them. try thinking about an opposite mobile case of super huge desktops. 5000×5000 or more. tons of windows. obviously something like global menu doesn’t scale to that either.

    you guys have done a really good job of sewing up the low end of display sizes but some of us still have, and hope for even bigger displays. please keep pumping out improvements for those too :)

    Comment by Dan Ballard — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 01:13

  122. Very, VERY NICE, Marco.
    Hope this become default on 14.04
    Keep going! :)

    Comment by Rael Gugelmin Cunha — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 03:37

  123. And I hope that, since the folks at Canonical are making changes, they add an option to keep the Global Menu always visible :)
    It is not that hard, and, doing so they will keep every single Unity user happy, since they’ll offer the 3 possible options.
    Personally I find this new option even less useful than the current implementation of Global Menu (the one that vanishes the menus when you aren’t making a mouse over).

    Comment by hictio — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 03:55

  124. > And I’m not that sure app’ developpers are aware of how people really use their softwares, regarding of usability and ergonomy

    Well, I sure hope they do, or at least try to. I’m an application developer myself, and I communicate a lot with my users, and take their input into account when designing my apps UI.

    > it’s not at all Canonical specific and that’s why each DE or distribution tries to answer in its own way.

    Well, I don’t agree at all here. Which other distribution twicks the menu system? Not Debian, not Fedora, not Suse, not Slackware, not Ubuntu GNOME, not Kubuntu, not Xubuntu, not Lubuntu, not Mint… the only distribution that does this is stock Ubuntu, through Unity, and maybe some of its derivatives.

    Comment by julien — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 09:05

  125. […] Ubuntu 14.04 Brings Back Menus In Application Windows ::: Slashdot ::: Treviño’s […]

    Pingback by Visto nel Web – 119 | Ok, panico — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 09:27

  126. […] source […]

    Pingback by Les menus dans les applications feront leurs retour sur Ubuntu 14.04 LTS — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 16:19

  127. I think you misunderstood. Nothing changes unless you ask for it to be changed. The way you have it now, is the same way in 14.04, except that you can change it if you want to.

    Comment by Jo-Erlend Schinstad — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 19:41

  128. While the one you describe was the designed solution, it had some technical difficulties, as it would need to change indicator-appmenu in a substantial way and so the unity panel service… So we decided to go with this implementation for now, not to change too much our platform, with the risk of introducing bugs.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 23:53

  129. The “faded” title was actually a bug that LIMs wanted to solve, and I personally don’t see much gain from showing that…

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 23 febbraio 2014 @ 23:54

  130. That’s unfortunate. It’s similar to one of my main issues with a global menu and multiple non-maximized windows. I hope the original design solution eventually gets implemented.

    Comment by Potatoes — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 00:03

  131. So many things … firstly people like me aren’t annoyed by the faded title as much as the placement of menus on the top. That is the “bug” if there ever was one. Secondly when your window is 12 inches wide, there is no reason to fade anything–there is plenty of room for both. Thirdly, it is frankly bizarre that one would not want to support showing simultaneously in order to make life easier for people like me.

    Comment by Gavin Engel — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 00:10

  132. Well, we might, but I’d personally prefer this solution (one more click is not that a problem imho)…

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 00:23

  133. I hope you’re right, I really enjoy using Ubuntu at this point, but I think the author of this post said it will be the default, and – with no option to switch off? That’s unclear to me.
    Like I said I have the crappy 15-inch display with 1366×768 res, like much of the world, so my mouse doesn’t have to “travel” anywhere to reach the menus in the panel, and I really like it this way.

    Comment by 2eurocents — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 01:26

  134. He’s right. The author of the post and of the code (myself) said that LIMs are optionally available, but we’re considering to set this *option* the default one. This doesn’t mean that global menu will be removed.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 02:26

  135. […] Marco Trevisan ci aggiorna sullo status di tutto questo, che a quanto pare per Ubuntu 14.04 sarà pronto: avremo le barre dei menu integrate all’interno delle barre del titolo, in una maniera che all’occhio risulta molto appagante. Se la finestra non sarà larga quanto richiesto dalla menubar, visualizzeremo solo le voci di menu che entrano nello spazio a disposizione, visualizzando una freccia che ci rimanderà al resto del menu. […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 14.04: le barre dei menu integrate nelle titlebar | oneOpenSource — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 09:42

  136. […] In terms of looks and usability, this should be a very good improvement for Trusty (read more here, here and […]

    Pingback by Weekly News Round-Up: Feb 17 – Feb 23 | TuxArena — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 12:20

  137. I better understand your point of view now. But does not Gnome do the same move with the “one-wheel-button” ?

    So you’re very right : developpers have to clearly signify which items in the menus are solid part of their core-software and which items deal with general functions and then can be dealt through OS.

    And beyond that, final user should have the ability to re-arrange core-app’menus regarding his own usage of the software – much needed in case of “richer / fatter” app’s.

    Sorry, I’m just a very happy user with Unity – and sometimes KDE :-D

    Comment by Gérald Maruccia — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 14:07

  138. > I better understand your point of view now. But does not Gnome do the same move with the “one-wheel-button” ?

    Well, GNOME does that to some of its applications, when they thing this is a good idea. As they have full control of their app design, this is not a problem.

    > Sorry, I’m just a very happy user with Unity – and sometimes KDE :-D

    No need to apologize! To each his own, I respect that.

    Comment by julien — 24 febbraio 2014 @ 14:28

  139. This is pretty neat: it finally makes sense to use sloppy mouse focus with Unity (which I struggled with since top-menu was introduced).

    HiDPI stuff doesn’t work for me properly though. Font sizes change only when set from the unity-tweak-tool, but they are changed for all the screens then.

    Comment by Danilo — 26 febbraio 2014 @ 15:45

  140. Well, if you have 1000 files in a folder, and ask any sample of people to rename all the files so they have the current date appended to the existing file names, CLI people would probably win out every time. It just means that CLI is indeed more efficient for such a mundane task (and it’s quite trivial to prove that CLI is more efficient for a bunch of things, with shell basically being a programming language with interfaces designed for managing files, programs and their input and output). Basically, it’s a test case that’s well suited to CLI but not to GUI.

    Being more efficient does not mean something is more usable (and more often than not, it’s exactly the opposite).

    The intersection of the two (usable and efficient) usually involves a very complex architecture that provides complicated answers to simple queries (think Wolfram Alpha, Google search box, or hopefully something that Unity dash search can become).

    All of them in existence are still read-only, but the idea is to get to a smart interface that will do what you want.

    Comment by Danilo — 26 febbraio 2014 @ 15:57

  141. I think you missed the point the CLI vs GUI comment was indented to be an obvious example on how sample stacking works.

    the whole post was about Manipulating studies in the social Sciences or in this case user studies

    Comment by Chad Germann — 26 febbraio 2014 @ 18:26

  142. Just to give you my experience after using the new menu locations for a week now. Interestingly, because I had got used to the global menu since 12.04 I still catch myself throwing the mouse to the top of the screen for the menu, only to remember where it now is! I’ve been through enough GUI transformations in my career to realise that this is just getting used to another location. However, even when I recall where the menu now is, I often throw the mouse past the window title bar – probably because the menu is not visible until you get there. Again, I know that I’ll get used to this, but for me on a smaller screen the global menu seems the more intuitive.

    So, basically, my feedback is that it works well and is a brilliant option for those with larger monitors. However, for working on the laptop or smaller screen, the global menu is more intuitive. Having the option is _brilliant_, so keep the option in! And if the option to have either is available I guess it then doesn’t really matter what you make the default. It would just seem rather counter-intuitive to make the title bar menu the default after getting people so used to the global menu over the last two years.

    Great work! Do be encouraged in all you are doing!

    Comment by Alwyn — 26 febbraio 2014 @ 18:54

  143. […] claimed that “having the applications menus in the top pane really worked very well in small screens but now, especially with HiDPI monitors getting more and more popular, the top panel could be […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu Unity to bring back local menus | Matias Vangsnes — 27 febbraio 2014 @ 00:45

  144. Nice!
    However, with the current implementaion of LIMs the double-click action in the titlebar to maximize the window works only if I click outside of the menu.
    May I suggest to consider reintroducing the old behavior for double-click? I use it a lot… :D :)

    Comment by Gio — 27 febbraio 2014 @ 16:58

  145. @3v1n0:disqus Why does global-appmenu(since beginning of Unity) & LIM not show icons on the menu for gtk-applications even with “show-icons-on menus” enabled from dconf? This is very uncomfortable when using menu-heavy applications like openshot or gimp.This actually forces users to read from text label rather than easily recognizing it from icons This also leads to inconsistent experience in Unity because other gtk-menus like menu in indicator-applet or simple right-click menu in nautilus do show icons.

    Gnome already created enough controversy by first removing it from gtk-3.10. Later, They patched it back.

    If this behavior is intentional, then I would say, Ubuntu (or Unity-Gtk, on this particular case), this time, has gone too far by not respecting XSettings.

    Comment by Khurshid Alam — 27 febbraio 2014 @ 21:07

  146. Cool, as for the HiDPI stuff, lots of things are still under heavy work, see https://code.launchpad.net/~3v1n0/unity/hidpi-better-scaling and https://plus.google.com/108101042776723451522/posts/3aKE8rN32ZA

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 28 febbraio 2014 @ 08:40

  147. It’s actually off by default as per design decision, but as I said on the psot and explained in this bug https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/unity/+bug/1283695/comments/2 can be enabled using the settings ;)

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 28 febbraio 2014 @ 08:41

  148. I think some applications does, but I don’t recall the internals (this side of the work is done by the indicators team), but one of the main reasons is related to the fact that we are exporting menus from the apps to the shell using DBus, and passing also images has not been a priority.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 28 febbraio 2014 @ 08:49

  149. How come Nautilus has two different app menu systems? Can Ubuntu solidify these in 14.04?

    Look at the Nautilus window. Why is there an App menu and there’s also a menu-button all the way to the right on the toolbar. This setup is very irritating. Why is this allowed in Ubuntu? It makes dealing with menu system confusing and inefficient.

    Comment by TJ — 1 marzo 2014 @ 18:44

  150. […] Ubuntu is ditching the global menu […]

    Pingback by Linux Outlaws 335 – They Lost the Allen Key | Sixgun Productions — 2 marzo 2014 @ 18:52

  151. Yes indeed… The fix has just been released to trusty. See http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/03/ubuntu-brings-full-menus-back-nautilus-apps-14-04

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 2 marzo 2014 @ 19:35

  152. “One more” is how bad things always start :) . One more click is not bad but 1 click is better. Especially when you’re dealing with several non-maximized windows on a large high PPI monitor.

    Why do you prefer not showing the local menu of non-active windows on mouse hover?

    Comment by guy — 3 marzo 2014 @ 02:40

  153. […] Want to have the newest Ubuntu version? Although it is still in beta, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS “Trusty Tahr” is available to install. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS features a few changes and added support for smartphones, tablets and TVs. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is currently built on the 3.13 Linux kernel, which means better 3D graphics capability. Also noted is the return to locally integrated menus. You can read more about this from Canonical software engineer Marco Trevisan in this post on his blog http://blog.3v1n0.net/informatica/linux/ubuntu-introducing-locally-integrated-menus-to-unity-7/ […]

    Pingback by BeanFixIt.com » How to install Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr — 4 marzo 2014 @ 20:34

  154. Actually, here’s yet another proposal for the design team (hope you have a direct line to them, Marco):

    When windows aren’t maximized, use the global top bar to show the title and the window top bar to show the menu. Both permanently. Or if the user is using the global menu, use the global top bar for the menu and the window top bar for the title. No need to vanish anything with non-maximized windows!!!!

    On maximized windows only: use the current approach of vanishing something, but provide the user with the choice for it to be the menu or the title.

    That would bring consistency, efficient use of space and choice for everyone AND actually completely fix bug 682788, which this latest patch only half fixes.

    Comment by Sicofante — 5 marzo 2014 @ 04:32

  155. […] Introducing Locally Integrated Menus to Unity 7 […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu Rising: Desktops, Servers, Phones, and Beyond | Techrights — 5 marzo 2014 @ 15:32

  156. Well, I think that decorations are to focus things first of all, then if we lose the power of focusing without causing any side effect, imho we could get more troubles. Also in windows full of widgets and clickable areas, and many menus this would be even worst.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 7 marzo 2014 @ 02:48

  157. We are :)

    https://plus.google.com/108101042776723451522/posts/3aKE8rN32ZA

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 7 marzo 2014 @ 02:49

  158. Well, yes… But the problem is still having different approaches… Not sure we can.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 7 marzo 2014 @ 02:51

  159. […] claimed that “having the applications menus in the top pane really worked very well in small screens but now, especially with HiDPI monitors getting more and more popular, the top panel could be […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu Unity to bring back local menus | g33k — 7 marzo 2014 @ 11:31

  160. I’m not sure I get it. You can’t technically? You can’t because of design issues? What do you mean by “different approaches”? John Lea’s proposal in the bug is addressing the two issues: the global/local nature of menus and their permanent/vanishing visibility. Only the first issue has been tackled by your solution. I’m proposing something that tackles both in a clean way and as part of your implementation (the opposite of a “different approach”).

    Comment by Sicofante — 7 marzo 2014 @ 13:49

  161. No, I was talking of showing different things on panel depending on the window state… As it would cause an inconsistent behaviour.

    Anyway I’ll include a gsettings key to always show the menus soon (although it won’t be in unity control center).

    PS: feel free to ping JohnLea on IRC, if you want.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 7 marzo 2014 @ 16:12

  162. Mmmm, I don’t see it inconsistent.

    Forgive my ignorance but I’ve never used IRC before (I guess I’m shy my English is not good enough for real time conversations). Can you point me to the specific channel where I can find John Lea?

    That gsettings key will be highly appreciated!

    Comment by Sicofante — 7 marzo 2014 @ 22:19

  163. Mr. author, you should learn to express yourself more clearly.

    Comment by 2eurocents — 10 marzo 2014 @ 18:21

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    Comment by Dorothy J. Hammond — 11 marzo 2014 @ 11:44

  165. @Sicofante:disqus don’t worry about your English!

    You can find him on #ubuntu-design (or #ubuntu-unity) channel btw.

    Comment by Marco Trevisan (Treviño) — 11 marzo 2014 @ 18:18

  166. […] Unity y Gnome reposicionan la barra de menús [2] […]

    Pingback by Cerveza Gratis 03 – emilcar compliant - Cerveza Gratis — 15 marzo 2014 @ 15:56

  167. […] had bad repercussions for high-pixel-density displays. The menus grew more removed from the applications themselves, so […]

    Pingback by Ubuntu 'Trusty Tahr' is a solid step forward, not a leap | Matias Vangsnes | Ubuntu VPS Hosting — 21 aprile 2014 @ 03:19

  168. hello I love your work, in my free time experiment with the GUI.

    I have a question if you can change depending on bond css window.

    example in the terminal using css black metacity.

    Comment by Felipe Uribe — 17 maggio 2014 @ 19:10

  169. If you would have just listened to YOUR CUSTOMERS in the first place, the need to switch back to the menus-per-window design and the loss of a great many Ubuntu customers would have been avoided

    Comment by Choda Boy — 23 ottobre 2014 @ 16:55

  170. I’m 100% with Sicofante. I use Eclipse most of the time and of all the stuff on the screen, the 10 items in the application menu (with a couple of hundred options between them) are a vital part of everyday work. This piece of screen real estate is probably more important than any other equivalent are area in the whole application so having them playing hide-and-seek is intensely frustrating. I like unity in 14.04 but the only way I’ve been able to work effectively is just to uninstall all the appmenu-xxx packages.

    Comment by Robert Cannon — 15 novembre 2014 @ 21:23

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